Appearances default

Published on August 4th, 2010 | by TWiG Crew

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TWIG APPEARANCES-TOONCAST EP 65 THE REAL GHOSTBUSTERS (Proper working version)

blarg!

EDITORS NOTE:
There was a problem with the original site’s link location and now this ep should work properly.Any issues, please email mike@thisweekingeek.net

In this TWIG appearance, Birdman grabs his proton pack and bitchslaps any talking gorillas and ghost robot skeletons to deliver the REAL goods on the REAL Ghostbusters on GeekCast Radio’s THE REAL GHOSTBUSTERS!

Episode description from GeekCast Radio

In the 65th episode of ToonCast Mike and Kevin are joined by Mike The Birdman Dodd of This Week In Geek and Review A Day!! They talk about The Real Ghostbusters. Oh wow there are only 35 episodes of ToonCast left.

Download the ep here
I ain’t fraid of no ghost!

Geeks:
Mike “TFG1″ Blanchard

Kevin “Optimus Solo” Thompson

Mike “The Birdman” Dodd Visit http://www.thisweekingeek.net and http://www.reviewaday.ca

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8 Responses to TWIG APPEARANCES-TOONCAST EP 65 THE REAL GHOSTBUSTERS (Proper working version)

  1. Neolarthytep says:

    Yea Rather lack luster. No info here I didn’t know.

  2. TFG1Mike says:

    Well the point on ToonCast is to reminisce on the cartoons we grew up with not give you information lol.

  3. EctoGlow says:

    You guys really needed to do more research on some of this stuff. Yeah you got the info right more or less but If you were gonna do something like this again go to the fans and bring someone who knows the facts for sure on and talk to them. I’d be glad to help out with your review of extreme ghostbusters if you ever get to it.

  4. Birdman says:

    I agree with you Ectoglow,I would have loved to bring Chris S from Proton Charging on the show as I really would have loved to have heard his piece.
    It means alot to have community involvement and stuff like this and we’re always open to this communication!

    Thanks for listening!

  5. You guys were talking about the voices changed. You forgot to mention that they actually did an episode that was about Janine’s voice changing.

    She had the most striking change, because she went from being New York accent to a midwest accent.

  6. Also, you guys mentioned the animation dropping off in later seasons, but I don’t think you guys really understand why that happened. It’s really not DiC’s fault (for once).

    Two very nefarious things happened in the late 80s that would bring an end to the classic age of American-produced/Japanese-animated cartoons.

    1. The market which made it possible for American studios to farm animation to Japanese studios, such as Tatsunoko and Toei, suddenly shifted, and it became very difficult and expensive to use these studios past 1986. At that time, there was a gradual shift to Korean studios, which were cheaper.

    2. Nelson Shin, producer of the Transformers animated series, opened a Korean studio called AKOM which took much of the load at that time. AKOM is one of the worst overseas studios of all time, and shoddiness of their animation can be seen in such Transfomers episodes as “The Autobot Run””, The Five Faces of Darkness”, “City Of Steel”, “Carnage In C-Minor”, and “The Rebirth”.

    And unfortunately, AKOM began to leave their stink on other beloved cartoons. The result was a noticeable drop in the quality of animation in shows such as Transformers, Real Ghostbusters, Captain N The Game Master, and Muppet Babies. The third seasons of both Transformers and Captain N are perhaps the most infamous among these. Other shows like GI Joe and Thundercats simply ceased to exist. (Thank god)

    Additionally, the first five episodes of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles had been animated by Toei, but every episode afterward was animated by AKOM. And now you know why the opening theme has such good animation over the rest of the show.

    Robotech, despite being stitched together from three pre-existing Japanese shows, had a planned second season which was to be written in America and animated in Japan by Tatsunoko Studios. Only three episodes of Robotech 2: The Sentinels were ever produced before the market for Japanese animation bottomed out.

    This is actually a very simplified version of what happened. I’m leaving a lot of stuff out. But basically, if you’ve ever noticed that all of the awesome Japanese animated cartoons suddenly disappeared during the latter half of the 80s, now you have a general idea of why.

  7. TFG1Mike says:

    Thasnks for the history lesson! You should so call OUR voicemail line and tell us in person. 502-526-5821. Thanks to everyone for the feedback on this episode. Again Neolarthytep go listen to some of our older episodes. The point of ToonCast is not so much a informational output, but more of what we reminisce on the cartoons from our childhood. http://www.geekcastradio.com/?cat=5

  8. I’ll try to remember that in the future.

    Also, I was trying to figure out where I had heard about the economic collapse of the old system of farming stuff to Japan. It’s in Robotech Art 3. Carl Macek (who’s no longer with us) had mentioned that the Dollar had fallen against the Yen, and so the budget wouldn’t stretch as far as it would in previous years, and this contributed to the toy licenser Matchbox, which didn’t have big budget to begin with, backing out.

    I extrapolated this to mean that this is what caused a lot of other shows to pull out of Japan and go for more affordable studios in Korea and the Philippines, which is probably still true, considering what happened to shows like Captain N and Real Ghostbusters, because the studios they switched to WERE cheaper.

    That was just bugging me for a while. I couldn’t remember what my source was on that.

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